postheadericon Sequestration kicks in, sympathy for government cuts rightfully hard to find

Obama needs to understand that just because you have checks in the checkbook you don’t necessarily have money in the bank.

Obama needs to understand that just because you have checks in the checkbook you don’t necessarily have money in the bank.

President Barack Obama signed the order Friday kicking in the cuts mandated by his sequestration plan.  While the cuts will hit areas best left alone, it is hard to feel sympathetic for a government that has long been spending outside its means.

The blame game is of course in full swing in Washington DC but the reality is there is but one man that bears the burden.

Obama was for sequestration before he was against it and in fact the entire idea originated from him and his economic team.  Further, when offered wide latitude to implement the cuts and ease the pain this past week, the president refused.

Never have we seen a president so set on ‘fundamentally transforming’ the nation steadfastly refuse to negotiate and give ground.  Ideological opposites have historically always been able to find common ground for the greater good.

Ronald Reagan and Tip O’Neill worked together to usher in an unprecedented economic expansion in the 1980s.  In the 1990s Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich, two men who disliked each other with a passion, were able to implement reforms and tax cuts that brought about prosperity.

With Obama’s ‘my way or the highway’ attitude, it is clear he will put leftist ideology above the good of the nation.

Republicans gave ground and let the president hike taxes on the wealthy, much to the chagrin of their constituents.  The people are well aware the government doesn’t have an income problem, it has a spending problem.

Now the time has come to work on the other part of the equation and bring the deficit and government spending under control.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, rightfully said this past week, “Well, Mr. President, you got your tax increase. It’s time to cut spending.”

Obama refused.

The $85 billion cuts from sequestration are absolutely minimal at a mere 2.4% of what is already a hyper-inflated budget.  They do however make cuts in unwise areas.

This week Republicans offered the president a measure that would have allowed him wide latitude in spreading those cuts to areas that could better sustain them.  This was a completely sensible move that would have ensured the military and other essential services were able to weather the storm with minimal disruption.

Obama however said he would not accept the offer and as a result, government agencies and more importantly, the people of the United States will suffer.  Now we all pay for the president’s ego and refusal to compromise.

While I am sympathetic to my fellow Americans that will be affected by the cuts, I have little sympathy for our government and its leader.

The Democrat controlled Senate has not passed an annual budget in four years.  The president failed to submit budgets as required by law and refuses to compromise.

Who is really to blame here?  Republicans have given ground, they have passed budgets in the House, and yet here we are.

Obama needs to understand that just because you have checks in the checkbook you don’t necessarily have money in the bank.

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One Response to “Sequestration kicks in, sympathy for government cuts rightfully hard to find”

  • Mike:

    Good points all. I feel like the American public is starting to see that this President, despite all his promises of “working on a bipartisan” deal, of total transparency and with mass media protection, that he and his administration is not able or willing to compromise. Compromise has become a bad word in Washington these days. Political sucicide if you will. You’re correct in stating that ideology trumps what’s good and best for all Americans. In my mind, it’s called leading from the rear. Are we out of checks yet?

    Mike in HR

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